WASABI IT’S AN ATTITUDE! (Digital Collage)

$30

Fine Art print paper. A2 size. Poster signed by the artist. No frame included.

In stock

Description

ABOUT THE VISUAL MICROPOLITICS SERIES

In the visual micropolitics series, I work on hybridism through a Frankenstein aesthetic, that is, an art of grafting and miscegenation, of overlaps or intersections between different cultures and artistic aesthetics, looking for new forms of visual and micropolitical sovereignty. Through an anthropophagist dialogue with the images of consumer society, the series seeks to evoke ghostly materials. The works “A Long Walk To Freedom”, “A Fat World” or “Make Love, Not War” stand out, whose themes range from criticism of child labor in Africa, Asia and Latin America by companies such as H&M, Nestlé , Zara, among others; Discrimination due to skin color or sexual orientation, disguised as “peace crimes” that promote institutional violence; Or the criticism of the Humanitarian Government and the apocalyptic chess game of the superpowers. The works seek to narrate a story seen from the bottom up, evoking the ghosts of humanity to act as contemporaries of the present, causing imbalances. The presence of images is a scar in the blank space, through which we can slip and stumble, proposing an encounter with the historicity of the image and reaffirming the contemporary artist as an image hunter-gatherer and, above all, as an urgent artivist. (Sílvia Raposo)
Sílvia Raposo was born in Lisbon, in 1993. Graduated in Anthropology, researcher in Arts and performer, her work is based on an anthropophagist dialogue with the images of the consumer society, placing the contemporary artist as a hunter-gatherer of images. Her first visual series of fine art prints “Visual micropolitics” seeks to be a scar in the white space of performance. Her work dialogues with hybridism through a Frankenstein aesthetic, that is, an art of grafting and miscegenation, of overlaps or intersections between different cultures and artistic aesthetics, looking for new forms of visual and micropolitical sovereignty.